• Correlating Intramural Biochemistry and Elasticity in Patients With Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    The natural history of an ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm is expansion resulting from hemodynamic factors acting in accordance to LaPlace’s Law and progressive arterial wall weakening. An aneurysmal expansion to 6 cm is associated with a 14.1% per year risk of rupture, dissection or death. However, the presence, and subsequent expansion, of the aneurysm rarely produces symptoms until catastrophic complications ensue. Once the complications are diagnosed, 24.8% of patients with a Stanford type A dissection die prior to hospital presentation, 14.5% die within 6 hours of hospital arrival, 28.9% within 24 hours, and 56.6% within 30 days. Although current guidelines suggest surgical repair when the aortic diameter reaches 4.5-5.0 cm, aortic complications can occur at even smaller diameters. Hence, early diagnosis of those aneurysms with a subsequent increased risk of a calamitous complication, regardless of diameter, would be of considerable clinical benefit.

    Read the full article on Science Direct: Correlating Intramural Biochemistry and Elasticity in Patients With Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    Author bio

    Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine, 2019-04-01, Volume 20, Issue 4, Pages 279-280, Copyright © 2019

     

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