• Angiographic Results After Percutaneous Coronary Interventions in Ostial Versus Distal Left Main Lesions

    Abstract

    Purpose

    We sought to evaluate angiographic outcomes in ostial and distal LM lesions.

    Methods

    176 patients with LM disease undergoing PCI were retrospectively included in this study. 9 months of angiographic and 12 months of clinical follow-up was obtained. Quantitative coronary analysis (QCA) was performed for all lesions, using an 11-segment model. Clinical endpoint measure was a composite endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and target lesion revascularization (TLR).

    Results

    During 12 months follow up after successful PCI, the composite endpoint occurred more frequently in distal LM bifurcation lesions mainly driven by elevated TLR rates (14.1% in distal LM disease vs. 5.6% in ostial/midshaft LM disease, P = 0.20). Concordantly angiographic binary restenosis (8.2% compared to 0.0%) and late lumen loss (LLL, 0.42 ± 0.97 vs. 0.28 ± 0.34 mm) were increased in distal LM bifurcation lesions compared to ostial LM lesions. In distal lesions highest values for LLL were observed in segments adjacent to the bifurcation (0.37 ± 1.13 mm and 0.37 ± 0.73 mm). On cox proportional regression analysis the angiographic parameter LLL in a bifurcation segment (P = 0.03, HR 1.68 [1.1–2.7]) as well as presence of diabetes mellitus as a clinical parameter (P = 0.046, HR 2.77 [1.0–7.5]) were independent correlates for occurrence of MACE in distal LM bifurcations lesions.

    Conclusion

    PCI of ostial LM in accomplished with low LLL (0.28 ± 0.34 mm) and binary restenosis rates. In distal left main lesions highest rates for LLL and binary restenosis were observed in segments nearest to the bifurcation and rather focused on the main vessel (0.42 ± 0.97 mm).

    Author bio

    Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine Volume 23, February 2021, Pages 22-27

     

    Source:

    Read the full article on Science Direct: Angiographic Results After Percutaneous Coronary Interventions in Ostial Versus Distal Left Main Lesions

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